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Tag Archives | karachi

Urdunama: RAWalpindi

So what else is new?  Pakistan claims India’s intelligence agency R&AW is involved in terrorism in Pakistan.  Pakistan’s news media outlets — described often as “vibrant” and “independent” — have very dutifully carried stories of R&AW’s alleged involvement, without asking for evidence to be shared.   Security agencies involved in operations against the Muttahida Quami Movement (MQM) in Karachi have apparently unearthed evidence of a R&AW hand.  Karachi Police’s SSP Malir Rao Anwar claimed that two MQM members arrested on April 30, 2015 had been “sent to India for training.”

The embattled MQM founder Altaf Hussain implied in a fiery speech that he would seek the help of R&AW.  Anyone who has ever had the misfortune of listening to (or worse, watching) Mr. Hussain’s speeches would know that there’s very little if any merit or credibility to anything he says.  But his comments drew the ire of the Pakistani military establishment, following which Mr. Hussain was forced to backtrack and underscore his credentials as a bona fide hub ul-watni.

Since then, R&AW’s “involvement” in Pakistan was explicitly called out at the Corps Commanders Conference, while Pakistan’s Defense Minister Khuwaja Asif claimed that R&AW had been formed to “wipe Pakistan off the map of the world.”

We now hear of a list being in circulation, purportedly compiled by Pakistan’s security agencies, of individuals and organizations collaborating with R&AW against whom operations are imminent (h/t @smitaprakash).  The following is an excerpt from the piece published in Ummat:

Pakistan’s military establishment has formally accused India’s intelligence agency RAW of being involved in acts of terrorism in Pakistan only after accumulating sufficient evidence to support its claim.  According to a credible source, a list of important individuals and NGOs with links to RAW has been compiled and operations against these individuals and NGOs are expected to commence soon.  ISI has painstakingly pieced together evidence from within the country, as well as from Afghanistan and neighboring countries.  It was only after this information was then shared with the Corps Commanders that a decision to conduct operations against RAW and its agents was taken.

According to sources, Gen. Sharif was not in favor of operations that could result in Pakistan having to redirect forces currently battling terrorists in one part of the country to the Indian border.  However, through the ISI and other agencies, he has compiled considerable evidence of several organizations and individuals cooperating with the enemy.  After sharing this information with army leadership, a decision for a major operation against such forces has been taken.

Army leadership has taken the civilian government into confidence and has the concurrence of the provincial governments of Balochistan and Khyber-Pakhtoonkhwa.  According to available information, RAW is involved in terrorism in Balochistan and in Karachi and has been using various agencies, NGOs and charitable organizations to further its goals.  These organizations are involved in spreading hatred and instability within Pakistan.

In one instance, intelligence agencies gave the impression that they were not aware of the activities of a key RAW agent who had arrived via London to Karachi ostensibly to conduct religious activities.  However, intelligence agencies had in fact known of his intended arrival in Karachi as soon as he left Delhi.   Intelligence agencies then allowed this individual to operate freely within Pakistan so that evidence of his activities and contacts could be collected.

Intelligence agencies will soon launch a “grand operation” against such individuals and organizations.  According to our source, 43 such NGOs and 25 individuals have been identified in Balochistan.  The ongoing operations in Karachi against the MQM have provided law enforcement agencies with indisputable evidence of MQM’s collaboration with RAW.  Additionally, ostensibly trustworthy individuals and organizations have also been identified as having received funds from RAW.  According to the source, these planned operations have nothing to do with India approaching the UN on the issue of Zaki ur-Rehman Lakhvi.

Security agencies intend to target RAW’s assets in Pakistan by themselves and if necessary, may present available evidence to international courts.  Available evidence shows India to be a significant sponsor of violence; however, evidence also suggests that some other countries are involved in terrorism inside Pakistan, including those that claim to be friends of Pakistan. [امّت]

 

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A history of violence

On Saleem Shahzad’s killing.

The killing of Syed Saleem Shahzad near Islamabad is but another example of the perils journalists face in Pakistan today for challenging the conspiracy-riddled narratives of the military-jihadi complex.  Through his articles in Asia Times, Mr. Shahzad gave us perspective on the inner workings of the MJC and its internal competitive dynamics.  Lesser journalists in Pakistan who tow the line of the MJC by putting forth conspiracy theories of underhand foreign agencies working in concert to dismember Pakistan are lionized and rewarded.  Little wonder then, that Pakistan ranks as one of the most dangerous countries for journalists (Freedom House, 2011).

Voice of America Urdu’s Waseem A. Siddiqui catalogs the history of violence (اردو) :
Pakistan journalists killed

Readers of this blog are no doubt familiar with the conspiracy theory-ridden narratives in Pakistan’s vernacular press.  Almost every tragedy in Pakistan is attributable to the machinations of the CIA, R&AW, Blackwater or Mossad.  Their ultimate quest being Pakistan’s nuclear weapons.  It should come as no surprise then that the recent attacks against a Pakistan Navy base in Karachi were immediately attributed to India.  Because that’s easy. And convenient.

In her recent visit to Pakistan, following the raid on Osama bin Laden’s hideout in Abbottabad, U.S. Secretary of State Hilary Clinton urged Pakistanis to understand that conspiracy theories “will not make their problems disappear.” But with journalists like these, I wouldn’t hold my breath.

Further reading: A brave piece by Mehmal Sarfraz, and Syed Saleem Shahzad’s brilliant interview/report on the resurgence of Ilyas Kashmiri and the 313 Brigade.


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"People give the Indian army a lot of leeway…"

More pearls of wisdom from the Writer Formerly Known As Sane, Arundhati Roy.  She recently hopped across the border to Pakistan to really sink her fangs into the country she calls home.  Speaking at the Karachi Press Club, she talks about the Taliban, the ongoing operation in Swat, Siachen, Indian elections, and the RSS, among other things.  True to her form, Arundhati talks at a tangent, jumping from one unrelated topic to the next.

What makes people like her and Praful Bidwai particularly dangerous isn’t the fact that they speak out against the institution.  It’s that they speak out by distorting facts and drawing parallels between issues that have no logical correlation to support their agendas.  Don’t let them tell you they don’t have an agenda. They do. Everyone does.  Here’s Arundhati at her prattling best:

Each day (Siachen glacier)  is being filled with ice axes, old boots, tents and so on. Meanwhile, that battlefield is melting. Siachen glacier is about half its size now. It’s not melting because the Indian and Pakistani soldiers are on it. But it’s because people somewhere on the other side of the world are leading a good life….in countries that call themselves democracies that believe in human rights and free speech. Their economies depend on selling weapons to both of us.

Each day, apparently, the glacier is being filled with “old boots”; I’m not even sure what she’s talking about here. Her concern clearly couldn’t be environmental, since the “substance” behind the drivel appears to be to apportion blame to the US (aka “democracies that believe in human rights and free speech”) for selling weapons to “both of us” with which the two above-fault former colonial nations fight wars they are conned into waging by the conniving West.  Only problem here is that India didn’t really receive any weapons from the US that it used to fight Pakistan in Siachen.  A convenient falsehood to support her anti-US agenda, certainly, and no different from the mindset of the Pakistani establishment that affixes blame on everyone but itself for the situation it finds itself in.  But wait, there’s more:

The RSS has infiltrated everything to a great extent..The RSS has infiltrated the (Indian) army as much as various kinds of Wahhabism or other kinds of religious ideology have infiltrated the ISI or the armed forces in Pakistan.

Clearly, she’s taking issue with Lt. Col. Purohit and his ilk in re the Malegaon attacks.  But the act of one man, as deplorable as it was, can hardly be equated to the fundamentalist indoctrination of an entire army over the course of 62 years that led it to slaughter 3 million civilians because they belonged to different ethnic and religious persuasions.  Apart from Purohit, what other examples does Arundhati Roy have of an RSS “infiltration” into the army? To be clear, the Indian army is battling infiltration.  But it isn’t from the RSS.  An inconvenient truth that Roy chooses to ignore.

Arundhati continues:

The Indian army is quite a sacred cow especially on TV and Bollywood.I think it is a sacred cow. People are willing to give them a lot of leeway.

Forgive me, but the armed forces of a developing nation that chooses to mind its own business and not stick its nose into political affairs deserves all the credit it gets.  The Indian army isn’t perfect. No army is.  Sure, the media chooses to turn a blind eye to the army’s conduct in Kashmir and Sri Lanka.  But the fact that India has had a virtually unblemished record in democracy since independence (a singular rarity in the developing world) is enough proof that this is an army unlike any other, and if it does get any leeway, it is well deserved.

Arundhati Roy is successful in the sense that her utter ignorance compels people like me to respond and set right the things that this malingering cretin masks with her eloquence.  The fact that she can string a couple of sentences together in English is often mistaken by India’s elite and the Western media as indicative of her mastery over subjects she has no experience in.  I’ve taken issue with Roy before as I take issue with her today.  Abinav Kumar, in his response to Roy’s much published diatribe right after the 26/11 terrorist attacks, said that Arundhati Roy suffered from a failure of the imagination.  I beg to differ.  Arundhati Roy suffers from a failure of the mind.

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